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Old 28th May 2014, 02:27 PM
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Default The British Accent

Why is it, when a British singer and an American singer sings the same lyric, they both sound the same? whereas, when they say the same verse of a poem, they would individually sound "British" or "American," respectively?

Why is that? I wanted to ask the forum here as there are both authentic "English" speakers as well as speakers of "American" who post here. I just wanted to here your theories.

AA.
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Old 28th May 2014, 03:15 PM
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I think it's because pop music is an American invention Aaron. Whereas literature and poetry most definitely are not. Doesn't matter if your English or Korean or French, the international language for singing pop songs is American.
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Old 28th May 2014, 05:05 PM
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Aaron when your speaking your regional dialect/accent comes through, so the same poem can alter from region to region, Bath alters from Barth to Baff, same as book = buck or buke............Singing is completely different.
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Old 28th May 2014, 05:33 PM
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and sometimes your "your" comes across as "you're." he he. just had to poke a little fun there.

I suppose, though, that the diction of pop music would stem from its roots (if indeed it did originate in America), just as the diction of opera might, for example, sound Italian, whilst an Italian pop singer might sound American.

It would seem to be proper, then, that the diction of some of the toasters in Reggae music might even sound Jamaican, even though he or she might in fact be English, etc.

Lily Allen, however, still possesses a strong English accent in her artistry of song. Right, or wrong, is not the point, just different, and if it works (ie. sells) then let it be sung, I suppose.

your Brummy from another Mummy

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Old 28th May 2014, 05:59 PM
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yeah.

But to communicate across the pond, we have to use the English language...Either in speech or Songs........ you'know off fe me scran dun out, am takin me lah into tiwn fe a bevvy.
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Old 29th May 2014, 01:05 AM
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Also are folks from Birmingham, Alabama called Brummy's or just the ones in England?
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Old 29th May 2014, 01:32 PM
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The British accent changes about every twenty miles.Trying to think of bands who sing in regional accents.Off the top of my head can only think of The Proclaimers, Chas and Dave and Catatonia.
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Old 30th May 2014, 12:38 AM
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So if the song is written with someone thinking in American ...it will all balance out only with that lilt ?

I guess the Proclaimers think in Scottish....

Our Dunc has his own transhoneyfied accent ......I did not notice any American intonation ..... that is skill .....fitting your accent to the melody ....so rather it is the song words which become the flexible elastic which bends to your voice .....CLASS ......
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Old 30th May 2014, 01:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhondda rudie View Post
The British accent changes about every twenty miles.Trying to think of bands who sing in regional accents.Off the top of my head can only think of The Proclaimers, Chas and Dave and Catatonia.
Twin Atlantic - verrrrry Scottish
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Old 1st June 2014, 10:10 PM
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another question I have is: During the singing, does is just come out that way (ie: it just is what it is, naturally, with no thought or effort to sound "American")? or Is it rehearsed, no, wrong word, (of course it's rehearsed) is it intentionally directed or coached (very intent on sounding "American")? or a little of both?

(just a note, lest anyone think me critical. my question stems more from curious observation rather than sinister or blind criticism.)
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