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View Full Version : THE WAILERS: Bob, Peter or Bunny?


Good Ambition
4th November 2007, 04:03 PM
Of the three original Wailers, it's Bob who had that edge......not the most original view, but there ya go..... :wink: ...Next for me is Tosh, and though I like Bunny's Blackheart Man and some of his solo work, his music doesn't move me as much....not to say that he isn't a musical giant. 8) (I heard that Robbie Shakespeare learnt a thing or two from him).

What's your thoughts? :D

UBlong2me
4th November 2007, 06:04 PM
Same as yours, sorry not very original...but hey...great minds (ahem) :mrgreen: :haha:

Tik
4th November 2007, 07:39 PM
japanese bloke by the name of stabby.......he was my favourite whaler

Waltjo
4th November 2007, 09:14 PM
japanese bloke by the name of stabby.......he was my favourite whaler

Even more sick Tik :roll: :roll: wot's up with ya :shock: :shock:

Aaron Otang
4th November 2007, 09:19 PM
The first ever vinyl 7" i bought was Bunny wailers Dreamland.....Still is one of my all time fave songs :wink: :wink:

Waltjo
4th November 2007, 09:25 PM
Would love to see the Wailers again 8) 8) they sounded terrific at the NEC 8) 8) better than at Cardiff :roll:

MAYBETOMORROW
4th November 2007, 11:14 PM
japanese bloke by the name of stabby.......he was my favourite whaler


:lol: :lol: :lol:

Baggariddim
16th November 2007, 03:56 AM
I have to say that I agree with your order of the t'ree. In terms of original view, they all are more or less in line with traditional Rasta ideology. But Bob's way of presenting it to the world, his honesty, his heartache, his life, his righteousness and awe-inspriring, magnetic presence and songwriting is what really sets them apart. He gave a spiritual as well as a political and conscious revolution on many deep levels we are still uncovering the layers of. I think Brother Tosh was the most radical and his songs really spark that fire. Except for a few so-so songs like his cover of Dylan's Don't Look Back, I love his vibe. Bunny is basically the man in the hills, but kind of odd. I have to say that his Blackheart Man, Bunny Sings The Wailers and Liberation are all classics and beautifully made. But his attempt at dancehall in the wake of his contribution to Marcia Griffith's Electric Boogie was downright embarrasing. What was he thinking? Anyway, together, their harmonies are the most soul stirring and beautiful. I wish they got together for another album before Father Bob's passing.

UBlong2me
16th November 2007, 08:23 AM
"It was a Livingstone, Marley, Tosh situation" :D

Enjoy the vid :wink:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-oX9AUgVjXs

Good Ambition
16th November 2007, 09:24 AM
I have to say that I agree with your order of the t'ree. In terms of original view, they all are more or less in line with traditional Rasta ideology. But Bob's way of presenting it to the world, his honesty, his heartache, his life, his righteousness and awe-inspriring, magnetic presence and songwriting is what really sets them apart. He gave a spiritual as well as a political and conscious revolution on many deep levels we are still uncovering the layers of. I think Brother Tosh was the most radical and his songs really spark that fire. Except for a few so-so songs like his cover of Dylan's Don't Look Back, I love his vibe. Bunny is basically the man in the hills, but kind of odd. I have to say that his Blackheart Man, Bunny Sings The Wailers and Liberation are all classics and beautifully made. But his attempt at dancehall in the wake of his contribution to Marcia Griffith's Electric Boogie was downright embarrasing. What was he thinking? Anyway, together, their harmonies are the most soul stirring and beautiful. I wish they got together for another album before Father Bob's passing.

Thanks Bagga. I'm reading a brilliant book called EXODUS by Vivien Goldman at the mo....I recceomend that to anyone into Bob and that sparked the topic. I'd agree with how you've put it here...........Tosh and Bunny weren't happy at all when the focus went on Bob around the Catch A Fire period, but I think history has proved it was the right move.....even in a democratic band as the Wailers was, a leader will always emerge........I love the early African Herbsman period of the Wailers, but I don't feel Bob compromised to become an international star....if anything he became more radical.

Baggariddim
16th November 2007, 06:36 PM
I definitely want to check out EXODUS. I'm also going this week to find the new book by Rita Marley on her life with Bob. I think it promises to be most revealing into his personal and musical life.

Peace,
Bagga....

FATHER TED2
16th November 2007, 07:09 PM
i reckon the 3 are equally important, but people in general will always remember bob more because he had the most success across the world, and possibly had the more marketable personality,
You could ask the same question about the maytels, is toots the best just cos his name was put at the front? 8)